SAT Vocabulary Words 7

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Approximately 5000 vocabulary words that should be memorized before taking the SAT. This lesson is broken into 26 parts.

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delirious

delirious (adj)
Raving.

delude

delude (v)
To mislead the mind or judgment of.

deluge

deluge (v)
To overwhelm with a flood of water.

delusion

delusion (n)
Mistaken conviction, especially when more or less enduring.

demagnetize

demagnetize (v)
To deprive (a magnet) of magnetism.

demagogue

demagogue (n)
An unprincipled politician.

demeanor

demeanor (n)
Deportment.

demented

demented (adj)
Insane.

demerit

demerit (n)
A mark for failure or bad conduct.

demise

demise (n)
Death.

demobilize

demobilize (v)
To disband, as troops.

demolish

demolish (v)
To annihilate.

demonstrable

demonstrable (adj)
Capable of positive proof.

demonstrate

demonstrate (v)
To prove indubitably.

demonstrative

demonstrative (adj)
Inclined to strong exhibition or expression of feeling or thoughts.

demonstrator

demonstrator (n)
One who proves in a convincing and conclusive manner.

demulcent

demulcent (n)
Any application soothing to an irritable surface

demurrage

demurrage (n)
the detention of a vessel beyond the specified time of sailing.

dendroid

dendroid (adj)
Like a tree.

dendrology

dendrology (n)
The natural history of trees.

denizen

denizen (n)
Inhabitant.

denominate

denominate (v)
To give a name or epithet to.

denomination

denomination (n)
A body of Christians united by a common faith and form of worship and discipline.

denominator

denominator (n)
Part of a fraction which expresses the number of equal parts into which the unit is divided.

denote

denote (v)
To designate by word or mark.

denouement

denouement (n)
That part of a play or story in which the mystery is cleared up.

denounce

denounce (v)
To point out or publicly accuse as deserving of punishment, censure, or odium.

dentifrice

dentifrice (n)
Any preparation used for cleaning the teeth.

denude

denude (v)
To strip the covering from.

denunciation

denunciation (n)
The act of declaring an action or person worthy of reprobation or punishment.

deplete

deplete (v)
To reduce or lessen, as by use, exhaustion, or waste.

deplorable

deplorable (adj)
Contemptible.

deplore

deplore (v)
To regard with grief or sorrow.

deponent

deponent (adj)
Laying down.

depopulate

depopulate (v)
To remove the inhabitants from.

deport

deport (v)
To take or send away forcibly, as to a penal colony.

deportment

deportment (n)
Demeanor.

deposition

deposition (n)
Testimony legally taken on interrogatories and reduced to writing, for use as evidence in court.

depositor

depositor (n)
One who makes a deposit, or has an amount deposited.

depository

depository (n)
A place where anything is kept in safety.

deprave

deprave (v)
To render bad, especially morally bad.

deprecate

deprecate (v)
To express disapproval or regret for, with hope for the opposite.

depreciate

depreciate (v)
To lessen the worth of.

depreciation

depreciation (n)
A lowering in value or an underrating in worth.

depress

depress (v)
To press down.

depression

depression (n)
A falling of the spirits.

depth

depth (n)
Deepness.

derelict

derelict (adj)
Neglectful of obligation.

deride

deride (v)
To ridicule.

derisible

derisible (adj)
Open to ridicule.

derision

derision (n)
Ridicule.

derivation

derivation (n)
That process by which a word is traced from its original root or primitive form and meaning.

derivative

derivative (adj)
Coming or acquired from some origin.

derive

derive (v)
To deduce, as from a premise.

dermatology

dermatology (n)
The branch of medical science which relates to the skin and its diseases.

derrick

derrick (n)
An apparatus for hoisting and swinging great weights.

descendant

descendant (n)
One who is descended lineally from another, as a child, grandchild, etc.

descendent

descendent (adj)
Proceeding downward.

descent

descent (n)
The act of moving or going downward.

descry

descry (v)
To discern.

desert

desert (v)
To abandon without regard to the welfare of the abandoned

desiccant

desiccant (n)
Any remedy which, when applied externally, dries up or absorbs moisture, as that of wounds.

designate

designate (v)
To select or appoint, as by authority.

desist

desist (v)
To cease from action.

desistance

desistance (n)
Cessation.

despair

despair (n)
Utter hopelessness and despondency.

desperado

desperado (n)
One without regard for law or life.

desperate

desperate (adj)
Resorted to in a last extremity, or as if prompted by utter despair.

despicable

despicable (adj)
Contemptible.

despond

despond (v)
To lose spirit, courage, or hope.

despondent

despondent (adj)
Disheartened.

despot

despot (n)
An absolute and irresponsible monarch.

despotism

despotism (n)
Any severe and strict rule in which the judgment of the governed has little or no part.

destitute

destitute (adj)
Poverty-stricken.

desultory

desultory (adj)
Not connected with what precedes.

deter

deter (v)
To frighten away.

deteriorate

deteriorate (v)
To grow worse.

determinate

determinate (adj)
Definitely limited or fixed.

determination

determination (n)
The act of deciding.

deterrent

deterrent (adj)
Hindering from action through fear.

detest

detest (v)
To dislike or hate with intensity.

detract

detract (v)
To take away in such manner as to lessen value or estimation.

detriment

detriment (n)
Something that causes damage, depreciation, or loss.

detrude

detrude (v)
To push down forcibly.

deviate

deviate (v)
To take a different course.

devilry

devilry (n)
Malicious mischief.

deviltry

deviltry (n)
Wanton and malicious mischief.

devious

devious (adj)
Out of the common or regular track.

devise

devise (v)
To invent.

devout

devout (adj)
Religious.

dexterity

dexterity (n)
Readiness, precision, efficiency, and ease in any physical activity or in any mechanical work.

diabolic

diabolic (adj)
Characteristic of the devil.

diacritical

diacritical (adj)
Marking a difference.

diagnose

diagnose (v)
To distinguish, as a disease, by its characteristic phenomena.

diagnosis

diagnosis (n)
Determination of the distinctive nature of a disease.

dialect

dialect (n)
Forms of speech collectively that are peculiar to the people of a particular district.

dialectician

dialectician (n)
A logician.

dialogue

dialogue (n)
A formal conversation in which two or more take part.

diaphanous

diaphanous (adj)
Transparent.

diatomic

diatomic (adj)
Containing only two atoms.

diatribe

diatribe (n)
A bitter or malicious criticism.

dictum

dictum (n)
A positive utterance.

didactic

didactic (adj)
Pertaining to teaching.

difference

difference (n)
Dissimilarity in any respect.

differentia

differentia (n)
Any essential characteristic of a species by reason of which it differs from other species.

differential

differential (adj)
Distinctive.

differentiate

differentiate (v)
To acquire a distinct and separate character.

diffidence

diffidence (n)
Self-distrust.

diffident

diffident (adj)
Affected or possessed with self-distrust.

diffusible

diffusible (adj)
Spreading rapidly through the system and acting quickly.

diffusion

diffusion (n)
Dispersion.

dignitary

dignitary (n)
One who holds high rank.

digraph

digraph (n)
A union of two characters representing a single sound.

digress

digress (v)
To turn aside from the main subject and for a time dwell on some incidental matter.

dilate

dilate (v)
To enlarge in all directions.

dilatory

dilatory (adj)
Tending to cause delay.

dilemma

dilemma (n)
A situation in which a choice between opposing modes of conduct is necessary.

dilettante

dilettante (n)
A superficial amateur.

diligence

diligence (n)
Careful and persevering effort to accomplish what is undertaken.

dilute

dilute (v)
To make more fluid or less concentrated by admixture with something.

diminution

diminution (n)
Reduction.

dimly

dimly (adv)
Obscurely.

diphthong

diphthong (n)
The sound produced by combining two vowels in to a single syllable or running together the sounds.

diplomacy

diplomacy (n)
Tact, shrewdness, or skill in conducting any kind of negotiations or in social matters.

diplomat

diplomat (n)
A representative of one sovereign state at the capital or court of another.

diplomatic

diplomatic (adj)
Characterized by special tact in negotiations.

diplomatist

diplomatist (n)
One remarkable for tact and shrewd management.

disagree

disagree (v)
To be opposite in opinion.

disallow

disallow (v)
To withhold permission or sanction.

disappear

disappear (v)
To cease to exist, either actually or for the time being.

disappoint

disappoint (v)
To fail to fulfill the expectation, hope, wish, or desire of.

disapprove

disapprove (v)
To regard with blame.

disarm

disarm (v)
To deprive of weapons.

disarrange

disarrange (v)
To throw out of order.

disavow

disavow (v)
To disclaim responsibility for.

disavowal

disavowal (n)
Denial.

disbeliever

disbeliever (n)
One who refuses to believe.

disburden

disburden (v)
To disencumber.

disburse

disburse (v)
To pay out or expend, as money from a fund.

discard

discard (v)
To reject.

discernible

discernible (adj)
Perceivable.

disciple

disciple (n)
One who believes the teaching of another, or who adopts and follows some doctrine.

disciplinary

disciplinary (adj)
Having the nature of systematic training or subjection to authority.

discipline

discipline (v)
To train to obedience.

disclaim

disclaim (v)
To disavow any claim to, connection with, or responsibility to.

discolor

discolor (v)
To stain.

discomfit

discomfit (v)
To put to confusion.

discomfort

discomfort (n)
The state of being positively uncomfortable.

disconnect

disconnect (v)
To undo or dissolve the connection or association of.

disconsolate

disconsolate (adj)
Grief-stricken.

discontinuance

discontinuance (n)
Interruption or intermission.

discord

discord (n)
Absence of harmoniousness.

discountenance

discountenance (v)
To look upon with disfavor.

discover

discover (v)
To get first sight or knowledge of, as something previously unknown or unperceived.

discredit

discredit (v)
To injure the reputation of.

discreet

discreet (adj)
Judicious.

discrepant

discrepant (adj)
Opposite.

discriminate

discriminate (v)
To draw a distinction.

discursive

discursive (adj)
Passing from one subject to another.

discussion

discussion (n)
Debate.

disenfranchise

disenfranchise (v)
To deprive of any right privilege or power

disengage

disengage (v)
To become detached.

disfavor

disfavor (n)
Disregard.

disfigure

disfigure (v)
To impair or injure the beauty, symmetry, or appearance of.

dishabille

dishabille (n)
Undress or negligent attire.

dishonest

dishonest (adj)
Untrustworthy.

disillusion

disillusion (v)
To disenchant.

disinfect

disinfect (v)
To remove or destroy the poison of infectious or contagious diseases.

disinfectant

disinfectant (n)
A substance used to destroy the germs of infectious diseases.

disinherit

disinherit (v)
To deprive of an inheritance.

disinterested

disinterested (adj)
Impartial.

disjunctive

disjunctive (adj)
Helping or serving to disconnect or separate.

dislocate

dislocate (v)
To put out of proper place or order.

dismissal

dismissal (n)
Displacement by authority from an office or an employment.

dismount

dismount (v)
To throw down, push off, or otherwise remove from a horse or the like.

disobedience

disobedience (n)
Neglect or refusal to comply with an authoritative injunction.

disobedient

disobedient (adj)
Neglecting or refusing to obey.

disown

disown (v)
To refuse to acknowledge as one's own or as connected with oneself.

disparage

disparage (v)
To regard or speak of slightingly.

disparity

disparity (n)
Inequality.

dispel

dispel (v)
To drive away by or as by scattering in different directions.

dispensation

dispensation (n)
That which is bestowed on or appointed to one from a higher power.

displace

displace (v)
To put out of the proper or accustomed place.

dispossess

dispossess (v)
To deprive of actual occupancy, especially of real estate.

disputation

disputation (n)
Verbal controversy.

disqualify

disqualify (v)
To debar.

disquiet

disquiet (v)
To deprive of peace or tranquillity.

disregard

disregard (v)
To take no notice of.

disreputable

disreputable (adj)
Dishonorable or disgraceful.

disrepute

disrepute (n)
A bad name or character.

disrobe

disrobe (v)
To unclothe.

disrupt

disrupt (v)
To burst or break asunder.

dissatisfy

dissatisfy (v)
To displease.

dissect

dissect (v)
To cut apart or to pieces.

dissection

dissection (n)
The act or operation of cutting in pieces, specifically of a plant or an animal.

SAT Vocabulary Words 7 | FlashDecks

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